Bike The Creek, Discover Bicycles As Transport

Category: Bicycles As Transport

The City of Brampton recently published a draft technical paper that identifies opportunities to improve bicycle parking supply.

Much of the conversation around using bicycles as transport tends to focus on education and the need for political support to build infrastructure — separated bike lanes. But there is an often overlooked topic that is important. Even if people are able to use their bicycle to get to their destination, then what? Where do they put their bicycle?

Bicycle Parking Minimum Requirements

The City of Brampton recently published a draft technical paper on parking and loading standards. The document identifies opportunities to improve bicycle parking supply by implementing minimum bicycle parking requirements.

That’s starting to change.

The City of Brampton recently published a draft technical paper on parking and loading standards. In it, the document identifies opportunities to improve bicycle parking supply by implementing minimum bicycle parking requirements.


Read: Draft Technical Paper #9 – Parking and Loading Standards Review


The document recognizes that minimum bicycle parking requirements are not presently included in the City of Brampton Zoning By-law. This has resulted in low or inconsistent availability in bicycle parking supply. More bicycle parking supply can increase the convenience and security of cycling and provide an alternative to automobile parking.

The document further proposes to analyze travel patterns for areas of higher cycling activity and to further promote cycling by providing bicycle parking in lieu of automobile parking.

Adequate bicycle parking supply is sometimes a missing piece in using bicycles as transport. That the City of Brampton is starting to consider how to address this is excellent news for carfree transportation.


Check out The Bikeport’s “Bicycles As Transport” YouTube Playlist


 

There’s something immensely practical about bike baskets and not having to worry about backpacks or pannier bags for quick errands.

Sometimes, it’s the simple things that make all the difference.

It probably sounds obvious to anyone who has already discovered the joy of a bike basket, but there’s something immensely practical about not having to worry about backpacks or pannier bags when you want to run a quick errand to the grocery store.

Source: The most important bike accessory you’ll ever own

 

The Bikeport seconds this.

The topic of baskets and other items that enable people to carry things using their bicycle is discussed in: Bicycles As Transport: Carrying Things

Check out these Cargo Capacity products for ideas on how to enable carrying things on your own bicycle.

The streets.mn website published an interesting post on Grocery Shopping by Bike. The author shares their personal experience on the topic.

The Streets.mn website published an interesting post on Grocery Shopping by Bike.

The author shares their personal experience on the topic, and includes these interesting  tips:

Rule number one is you don’t want to try to get around with shopping bags hanging from your handle bars. You’re going to need a place to put stuff. A basket out front. A cargo rack and panniers in the back. Or go really crazy and get yourself a cargo bike. Get the right tool for the job. Source: Grocery Shopping by Bike

Ready to get started on grocery shopping by bike? Check out some of the Cargo Bike options available through The Bikeport.

 

This episode of Bicycles As Transport discusses communication.

 

 

Signalling

Signals are used to indicate to others what we intend to do (HTA 142). There are 3 signals to know:

 

  1. Left turn
    Extend left arm and hand straight outward
  2. Right turn
    Extend right arm and hand straight outward
  3. Stop/Slow Down
    extend left arm out, bend the elbow at 90 degrees, forearm pointed down with hand extended

 

Body Language

Body language can offer guidance and context regarding our intended actions. Being “assertive” means being decisive and firm, and avoiding ambiguity. Stopping with feet firmly planted on the ground is an example of clearly communicating “I have stopped here”. Placing a foot on a pedal suggests an indication that you intend to start moving again.

 

Signalling Sequence

  • Shoulder check, in direction you want to move to, to see that way is clear
  • Signal in the same direction
  • Final shoulder check to ensure way is still clear before maneuvering

Check before slowing down or stopping also.

Rule of thumb: Check of the shoulder of the arm you’ll be signalling with.

 

Remember to subscribe for future episodes!

 

Disclaimer: “Bicycle As Transport” videos are for demonstration purposes to provide general information on lawfully using a bicycle. They are not CAN-BIKE instruction videos, are not comprehensive, nor provides specific advice or any guarantees. You must determine for yourself what your experience, training and competency level is with using a bicycle. The Bikeport by Kevin Montgomery disclaims any liability in connection with the use of this information.

To arrange a CAN-BIKE course, please visit:
http://bikeport.ca/courses/available-courses/